The Rise Of The Jacksonian Era

1540 Words Sep 25th, 2014 7 Pages
The Jacksonian Era was often described as a time of “democratization of politics” in the United States. However, democracy, at this time, was only defined as equality and justice for white males. There were improvements that benefited the common people, such as universal male suffrage, but these excluded women, Africans, Indians, and the rest of the population in the country. In addition, Andrew Jackson was not very democratic as he violated the Constitution and used the authority of the government for his personal issues. Meanwhile, today’s American society is a true democracy because every citizen, despite sex and race, is protected and given equal rights and opportunities. Back then, the United States did not achieve true democratization because there was not equality among all the people and Andrew Jackson abused his power as president. One major improvement in the United States during the Jacksonian Era was the expansion of voting rights. In document one, the map showed that all the states, except Kentucky and Vermont, permitted voting rights only to tax-paying landowners in 1800. By the time of the Election of 1828, in which Andrew Jackson was elected president, states removed their restrictions and all white men were allowed to vote. As a result, there appeared a significant increase in the number of voters and political participation. The common men were also able to hold public offices as they became more elective than appointive. Indeed, the universal male…
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