The Road - Cormac Mccarthy

954 Words4 Pages
Imagine a desolate and dismal world that deteriorated with scarce supplies of food and shelter and there is only a few survivors left--including yourself and one of your family members. In hopes of survival, what measures would you take? Would you go to the extreme by cannibalism or committing suicide? On the other hand, would you choose to be on an ethical route by grasping on life delicately? In the midst of the unflinching and empty world with virtually no hope, the father and son in the novel, The Road by Cormac McCarthy, choose to be the “good guys” by staying alive and refraining from cannibalism and thievery. They tried desperately to remain alive by roaming as nomads looking for shelter, edible foods, and avoiding the “bad guys”…show more content…
The father immediately shot and killed. As the father and son ran away and recovered from it, the father said, "You wanted to know what the bad guys looked like. Now you know. It may happen again. My job is to take care of you. I was appointed to do that by God. I will kill anyone who touches you. Do you understand?”(75). The son nodded and asked, “Are we still the good guys?”(75). The man replied, “Yes. We 're still the good guys” (75). The conversation reveals the unconditional and blatant love the father has for his son, while simultaneously revealing the son 's growing concerns about their actions as the "good guys." The lines occur after the man has shot and killed the attacker who threatened the boy with a knife at his throat. The passage also conveys the hypocrisy in morality between the man and the boy. The man believes his killing was justified because it was committed in the act of saving his son; God assigned a responsibility he says. The boy is concerned about the nature of the act. The son is confused if they can still be considered the good guys since his father killed a man. Even the son’s doubt of his father’s motive, the father believes he needs to protect his son--regardless of the circumstances. The son is shaken anticipation and fear for how the future will unfold, especially if he is going to be

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