The Role Of Racial Tension And The Consequence Of Reconstruction And Military Policy During World War II

1666 Words Aug 2nd, 2014 7 Pages
John Dower takes a look at the role of racial tension and the consequence of reconstruction and military policy in the Pacific theater of World War II. These racial tensions in World War Two were not confined to the tensions between Nazi Germany and European Jewish persons. These feelings were spread between other European groups, the United States, and Asian countries. The racial feelings that lay between Japan and the United States was readily displayed through various mediums, which include propaganda film, written documentation, and cartoons. Military and public figures were also documented expressing these views of racial inferiority.
Part one of Dower’s book goes through ideas before, during and after World War II. Starting off describing the racial, yet simultaneously hypocritical, ideals that supported the war efforts for either side of the fight. World War II, though defended to the masses of Allied supporters as, “combating tyranny and oppression and defending ideal moral order,” (3) but the war truly exposed the hypocrisy, exhibiting racial pride and arrogance to the enemies. “Even while denouncing Nazi theories of “Aryan” supremacy, the U.S. government presided of a society where blacks were subjected to demeaning Jim Crow laws, segregation was imposed even in the military establishment, racial discrimination extended to the defense industries, and immigration policy was severely biased against all nonwhites” (5). The United States was fighting against an…

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