The Role of Connecting Unrelated Events in Developing Intelligence

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On the Shoulder's of Giants: The Role of Connections in Developing Intelligence

Abstract

This paper provides motivation for making connections between unrelated events as a basis for intelligence. The ability to apply this extended information as a problem-solving technique instantiates the true nature of intelligence. Therefore, it is obvious the field of artificial intelligence should use the same approach. The way these connections are made and the occasional necessity for their modification is discussed. Examples are given showing the use of connections between linguistics and sociocultural systems studies and between engineering design and nature. Next, several examples connecting artificial intelligence with computer
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Susan connected her falling during the biking accident to the doll falling. Sentient beings use these connections as one method of developing intelligence. Therefore, it stands to reason artificial intelligence researchers rely on these connections to forward study in the field. Connections have been found to exist between linguistics and sociocultural systems studies and engineering and nature. Also, connections exist between artificial intelligence and computer programming, mathematics, astronomy, and engineering. Researchers in artificial intelligence themselves have varied backgrounds. This, however, is not unique to the field. History shows a precedence for connectionist activity in many of the great discoverers of the past. Therefore, researchers in artificial intelligence are expected to continue the practice of drawing from other disciplines in their quest to develop artificial intelligence.
Early Connections: The Role of Experience

Leonardo da Vinci said: "all our knowledge finds its origins in our perceptions" (Willis, p. 47). Just like falling off a bike, experiences form one's perception of how the world functions into a term called folk physics (Bechtel, p. 72). These workings can then be applied to new problems. Tackling new problems using previous solutions or experiences and applying this information to unrelated problems is known as analogy in problem-solving (Andrew, p. 7). Sometimes these analogies are incorrect, but
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