The Role of God and Religion in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, the God is one who does not interfere with what people are doing on Earth. He does care about them, even if they have done wrong, doesn’t try to change them, or their morals. He is described as a “watcher” (Fitzgerald 167). He watches people cause their own destruction but does not do anything about it. The role of God and Religion in Gatsby is evident in the lack of religion among the upper/business class, it’s effect on mortality, and the symbolism of God. In upper/ business characters, such as Jay Gatsby and Tom and Daisy Buchanan, there is no mention of religious affiliation. Unlike many churches and their members, their outright disregard of Prohibition laws shows that they didn’t support …show more content…
In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, the God is one who does not interfere with what people are doing on Earth. He does care about them, even if they have done wrong, doesn’t try to change them, or their morals. He is described as a “watcher” (Fitzgerald 167). He watches people cause their own destruction but does not do anything about it. The role of God and Religion in Gatsby is evident in the lack of religion among the upper/business class, it’s effect on mortality, and the symbolism of God. In upper/ business characters, such as Jay Gatsby and Tom and Daisy Buchanan, there is no mention of religious affiliation. Unlike many churches and their members, their outright disregard of Prohibition laws shows that they didn’t support it. They are self-absorbed, excessive drinkers and they lie to achieve what they want. These are all characteristics most religions do not support. Early on in the novel, religion is blamed for Tom and Myrtle’s infidelity, saying that “Daisy is a Catholic, and they don’t believe in divorce” (Fitzgerald 38). Though Nick contests, thinking Daisy was not a Catholic and saying he “was a little shocked by the elaborateness of the lie” (Fitzgerald 38). This passage is the first time it is truly confirmed that religion is pretty much absent from all of the characters’ lives. As it only serves as an excuse for Tom’s not marrying Myrtle. Whereas, with religion in relation to George Wilson is quite the opposite. Wilson’s mention that “God sees

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