The Romantic Movement Of Mary Shelley 's Frankenstein, And The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

1909 WordsNov 3, 20148 Pages
Frankenstein: Romanticism The novel, Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, demonstrates many different romantic ideals such as, the adoration of nature, extreme location, nationalism and exaggeration of emotions. The romantic movement was in response to the reason and logic dominated enlightenment era. Frankenstein, contrary to the enlightenment, demonstrates romanticism through glorifying one’s feelings and straying from the classroom towards nature. Shelley’s ideals paralleled that of: Edmund Burke, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Mary Wollstonecraft, John Locke and the poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”, all of which express romantic ideals. Nature is very important to romantics; it is a departure from the enlightened ideals of study and the “classroom” environment. Dr. Victor Frankenstein shows a great appreciation of nature through diction, especially through Edmund Burke’s idea of the sublime. Burke’s article, On the Sublime, defines sublimity in relation to nature, “astonishing [...] with a degree of horror”, which is a feeling Dr. Frankenstein frequently describes when he is in nature. In one passage, Frankenstein uses the words, “troubled”, “awful majesty”, “wonderful and stupendous”, “vast” and “glittering” (Shelley 101). These words resemble the “sublime” by combining the beauty of nature and the terror it’s vastness brings, just as Burke illustrates. Shelley also uses imagery. Imagery portrays the beauty that the character’s see in nature to the reader. One instance of

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