Essay on The Scientific Revolution

1098 Words 5 Pages
There were three major revolutions at work during the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, the scientific revolution, the enlightenment revolution and the political revolution. All of these revolutions have shaped western thought and ideals to this day and continue even in this age to shape western thoughts and ideals. What brought us to our thinking of today? Which, if any of the three, were the most important in shaping our thoughts on science, politics, and our social structures? Or were each an independent revolution without consequences on the others? The scientific revolution and the change in thought that it produced was the foundation for the enlightenment revolution, and in turn the enlightenment revolution was the …show more content…
He came up with multiple mathematical laws, with the integral one being the law of universal gravitation. Two other very important people in the progress of the scientific revolution were Francis Bacon (1561-1626) and Rene Descartes (1596-1650). Bacon formalized the empirical method, also known as empiricism. Empiricism is the theory of inductive reasoning that calls for acquiring evidence through observation and experimentation rather than reason and speculation. Descartes’ theory was Cartesian dualism. Descartes thought that you should doubt everything that could be doubted and then use deductive reasoning from self-evident principles to understand scientific laws. Both of these men’s theories make up the modern scientific method. (McKay, 2009, pp. 493-499)

The enlightenment was heavily influenced by the scientific revolution. So much so that two of its three core concepts are the use of reason and the scientific method, along with progress. The new world view brought about by the scientific revolution brought people to believe that the same principles could be used to ascertain all aspects of life. Enlightenment thinkers believed if they could define the laws of human existence they could better their societies and therefore better the people. People began to question the unquestioned beliefs based