The Sense of Hope Instilled by Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deals

988 WordsJan 26, 20184 Pages
Hope is a feeling of trust, a feeling of expectation and desire for a certain thing to happen (dictionary.com). Franklin Delano Roosevelt instilled the feeling of hope in the American society by creating the New Deal, a series of federal programs enacted in the United States between 1933 and 1938 in response to the calamity of the Great Depression (Schlesinger 25), in the 1930s during the Great Depression. He proclaimed, “Great power involves great responsibility” (Brainy quote). “The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression in the decade preceding World War II” (Schlesinger 45). It dampened the spirits of Americans and caused them to have a negative outlook on the world because it lead to hunger and took away many jobs, however Roosevelt had great responsibility in creating the New Deal which immediately lifted their spirits and helped create banking reform laws, emergency relief programs, along with agricultural programs. Although Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal did not end the depression, it was a success in creating new programs that brought relief to millions of Americans by it creating social security, reducing unemployment, and creating other programs with multiple outcomes. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal was successful in restoring public confidence and creating programs that brought relief to Americans by creating social security. Firstly, “Roosevelt restored public confidence by creating the Social Security Act of 1935, which was a significant

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