The Soviet Union, Communism, and the Vietnam War Essay

3150 Words 13 Pages
A quarter of a century after the Fall of Saigon, Vietnam continues to exercise a powerful hold of the American psyche. No deployment of American troops abroad is considered without the infusion of the Vietnam question. No formulation of strategic policy can be completed without weighing the possibility of Vietnanization. Even the politics of a person cannot be discussed without taking into account his opinion on the Vietnam Ware. This national obsession with Vietnam is perfectly national when viewed from a far. It was the only war that the United States has ever lost. It defined an era of American history that must rank with the depression as one of this nation’s most traumatic. It concluded with Watergate and led many to believe that the …show more content…
as active participants. Avoiding a head on clash with the Soviets meant that the Cold War would have to be fought indirectly and on the peripheries. This strategy involved a positive and negative thirst. Positive in that the United States would actively support friendly states and allies. This support would encompass economic, military, and diplomatic aid. The most famous example is the Marshall Plan. By generously helping Western Europe rebuild after the war, the United States was able to effectively quash any Soviet designs in that part of the continent. It is sometimes forgotten how much popularity far-left parties had in certain countries. (France and Italy especially) immediately after the war, American involvement in Greece was another prime example. The United States provided a significant amount of support and material to help the Greek government suppresses a communist backed rebellion. Also, to a lesser extent, the Unites States supported the Shah of Iran in helping drive out Soviet troops who were reluctant to leave. Combined with the invasion of South Korea by the north. American policy makers forged another key assumption. On that would prove central to the Vietnam question. The U.S.S.R. was seen as an expansionist for that had to be countered at every turn possible. There could be no end the United States vigilance. A peaceful and calm co-existence was not viewed as being possible. One can view
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