The Stack

977 Words Feb 26th, 2015 4 Pages
The stack

In life problems solved by confrontations is mandatory, no matter how hard you try to avoid them, sooner or later they will catch up, and stacking them instead of confronting them, will only make the problems bigger. Don’t wait for others to do your dishes take responsibility. That is among other things what Rose Tremain writes about in the short story ”The stack”, which was written and published in 2000.

The story is told by an 3. Person omniscient narrator bound to John McCreedy.
The main theme in the story is family problems that we can see, because the story is about a family that doesn’t function. The communication is bad, and the tone is hard between the members, they don’t like talking to each other and you get the
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Just like McCreedy drinks to forget his problems, Hilda is a heavy smoker. The two children is a girl on 9 named Katy and a boy Michael on 13, they are living in a disturbed family where communication isn’t a matter of course. Katy loves her father, and looks up to him, so when he says nettle soup will make her beautiful, she believes him, because she is young and naive.
McCreedy things it is time for the smoke to kill Hilda, and he is “trying so hard” to love Katy, this two examples describe pretty well how McCreedy feels about his family.
In the stories there are many different symbols. The garden where Katy is playing, is overgrown, untidy and filled with nettles, it symbolizes the family. Nettles are an ugly and “evil” plant, and it has overgrown their life. We are told that Hilda tried to make the garden pretty by planting roses, “Looking at where they grow so fiercely, crowding out the roses Hilda planted years ago.”(side 2) It symbolizes Hilda’s attempted to make the family work and “pretty”, and when McCreedy says no to cutting down the nettles, it shows how he don’t do anything good for the family, and don’t try to make it work.
Then there are the menu cards in a pile. Hilda has pushed them aside, it represents the problems in the family, all closed up and pushed aside. It is here the rising action begins, because McCreedy takes one and opens it, in a figurative sense

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