The Strong Sense Of Motherhood, By Sylvia Plath

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The aim of this present paper is to give a detailed analysis of the psychological indication of a human mind before being a mother after pregnancy. The name Sylvia Plath, an American confessional poet, itself is the matter of great psycho as it has been discussed a lot since the past few decades. With this two poems foreshadowing the cult of the deep psychology of a girl before having a sense of motherhood completely, Plath exaggerates the notion of the strong sense of motherhood as well as her own feeling over the unborn being growing up gradually in herself. A deep psychology and strong sense of motherhood completely grasps over her brain made her able to pen the theme of her strong feeling over the unborn. And this kind of physical as well…show more content…
Plath’s own brush and anguish with barrenness didn’t last too much long. Shortly after the skillful diagnosis of a doctor’s temporarily infertility she became pregnant with Frieda. Apparently Plath’s joy in producing children was evident and the effect on her sense of well being was considerable. After the birth of her first child she wrote: “I think having babies is one of the happiest experiences of my life. I would like to go on and on!” In motherhood Kate Moses argues Plath’s core ambition and deep calling. Moses also points out that in her “cow heavy” state Hughes writes, “That was the you, Plath could not suppress the exuberant joy she felt at being a mother and wrote a letter to her mother in joy “ I’m going to have all my babies at home; I’ve loved every moment of this…show more content…
There are few poems which surprisingly talk about children from the parents’ point of view. The child on swallowing the world develops its own clear voice. In the poem Metaphors Plath compared herself to a riddle in nine syllables implying the long nine months of pregnancy before child birth and also intensifies the pang and suffering of carrying of a baby in her womb. The strong depiction of the figurative use of the melon skillfully corroborates the two sides of the prototype of a female character- one is of woman and the another is of an unborn baby that is resembled with “fine timbers”. Kate Moses concludes that in the poem’s culminating lines Plath’s narrator becomes completely and willingly “effaced” allowing her child full ownership. His stark idealization of “loaf’s big” image symbolizes the true picture of a pregnant woman whose womb is filled up by the unborn baby. Her strong depiction of the close-connection of a mother with that of her unborn child is incorporated by this images like “ponderous house”, “a cow in calf”
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