The Struggle Of The Revolutionary War

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In the modern era, massive debates have arisen on both miniscule issues and important problems. This paradigm of debating has been in effect since the founding of the United States. Without argument and without logic and reason, the United States would have never seceded from the British Empire. The colonies began with a diminishing hope of survival, however, eventually reached the point where they are able to fight the greatest empire of their time. This, however, was not simple; adding on to the countless lives fighting, many minds clashed as well. Without these philosophers, the very founders of our great nation, the United States of America would have not existed. The Revolutionary War began with the struggle between great minds: these were the philosophers who supported Thomas Paine, urging military war; moderates like Ben Franklin, who advocated unity and was resilient about total war; and loyalists who sustained James Chalmers, argueing the foolishness of a revolution-- in the midst of 13 diverse colonies. The revolutionary radicals were mainly focused on war because of personal sentiments. The greatest pro-war thinker was Thomas Paine; he wanted outright revolution against the British. Paine had sensed the rise of tension, the spirit of rebellion, that had steadily mounted in the colonies after the Boston Tea Party and when the fightings had started. Paine believed the colonies had all the right to revolt against a government that imposed taxes on them without
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