The Suicide Among Student Debtors

1333 Words Sep 3rd, 2014 6 Pages
Jason Yoder, a 35 year old graduate from Illinois State University in organic chemistry, graduated from the university with a $100,000 student loan debt and he struggled to find a job in his field. In 2007, his mother and his professor found his body in one of the labs on the campus, and the police declared that he had committed suicide. The media reported the incident and it was posted on many sites. While many expressed sympathy with Jason and blamed the student lending system, others blamed Jason and said that it was his responsibility to pay his debt. C. Cryn Johannsen, Founder and Director of All Education Matters, wrote in her blog "Suicide Among Student Debtors: Who 's Thought About It?” Most of the responses were from people confessing of feeling suicidal (Johannsen, 2012). Jason’s incident was not the first suicide because of debt, and it will not be the last one.
These cases are enough for us to think about the student lending system in the U.S. It forces us to ask an important question, whether a college education is worth the debt or not. For me, the answer is clearly yes it is worth it. Today, a college degree is an essential requirement for the majority of careers, and education is important even if you have to go in debt to get a degree. A college degree will raise your chances to succeed.
The overall amount of the student debt in the U.S. has tripled in 10 years, from $363 billion in 2005 to more than $1.2 trillion today (Nelson, 2014). It has increased for…
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