Essay on The Temple of Athena Nike

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The Temple of Athena Nike exemplifies the early Greek belief that the gods, specifically Athena, held divine providence over government and victory in war. It was built as part of the same project as the Parthenon, one of the greatest achievements of Mycenaean Greece. Lasting from 1300-1000 B.C.E, Mycenaean Greece bordered Epirus, Macedonia, Phrace, Phryapa, Mysia, Caria, and Lydia. Encompassing this time span, Ancient Greece lasted from 8000 to 50 B.C.E. The achievements of Athens in this time include the Pythagorean Theorem and the Socratic dialogues. The epic Trojan War was said to have occurred in Mycenaean times as well. So were the Ionic Greeks who built this ancient temple. (Ancient-Greece.org)(about ancient history.com) In the…show more content…
His statue adorns Kolokotroni Square. In front of Old Parliament, this equestrian statue's location symbolizes his celebration atop a hill. Another similarity of these two structures is their open air feel, which reflects the motives of Ancient Greek democracy, as is shown in its open meetings where freedom of speech was upheld. Such are the Temple of Athena Nike's connections with government and warfare.
(Calvin, Calvin.edu)(Watterson, 25) The Temple of Athena Nike was built where it is for various strategic and religious reasons. Pericles rebuilt it as part of an effort to increase morale and renew culture during wartime. It was built over a previous temple to Athena, which was used for similar things. Utilized continuously by Bronze Age Greeks, the temple also served as a military base. References to Nike, the goddess of victory, also strengthened the luck associated with this structure and, therefore, its appeal as a fort. It also was arranged to face an altar to the east. Furthermore, the location affected the use of stone, as the natural shapes and quality of local marble inspired the Doric and Ionic orders. Thus, the Ancient Greeks had reasons for placing the Temple of Athena Nike where it still stands today. (Ancient-Greece.org)(Reidel, Brown.edu) How and by whom was the Temple of Athena Nike
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