The Theme Of Dreams In The Great Gatsby And Moulin Rouge

1912 Words8 Pages
Within the films The Great Gatsby and Moulin Rouge the theme of dreams is consistently present. Baz Lurhmann who directed both films used numerous filmic techniques to convey the influence of dreams. A dream is an aspiration and fantasy that one deeply desires to attain. Dreams go hand in hand with ambition and thus drive the characters’ actions. However, in my opinion, dreams may take on an idealistic and delusional nature and thus act as unattainable and unrealistic entities. Thus this essay will focus on the unrealistic nature of the characters’ ambitions and the consequent failures of their dreams. For the purpose of this essay I will be discussing different scenes within the films and the numerous filmic techniques used that explore the…show more content…
The American Dream is seen as failure as it fails to alleviate the widespread poverty, which is seen in the Valley of Ashes. Also the superficial nature of the American Dream is seen through the vain prosperity experienced by Gatsby. Finally the Americna Dream is a mirage which promises happiness yet is unable to fulfil its promise. Furthermore the film Moulin Rouge addresses the naive promise of love that these characters dream to obtain and the consistent obstacles that prevent the characters from acquiring their ambitions. One can notice how Satine’s illness dictates the greater part of her decisions and limits both her and Christian from acquiring their shared dream of love. Further the obstacle of Satine’s ambition to become a “star” directs majority of her actions and thereby hinders her and Christian from acquiring their dream of love. Likewise, Satine holds a loyalty to the Moulin Rouge, which also acts as a hindrance to her and Christian’s love affair. This essay further looks at the similarities and the differences between these two films. This essay will thus focus of the presence of dreams and how these dreams are merely unrealistic…show more content…
It inhabits Gatsby’s dream of unbounded wealth and attempts to allure Daisy from across the river. Image two shows an establishing shot of Gatsby’s house that introduces this vibrant, vast and extravagant lifestyle led by this rich demographic. It shows this ‘kaleidoscopic carnival’ of people from every ‘walk of life’ and ‘every corner of New York City’ descending upon Gatsby’s house. The house welcomes everyone with all its windows lit up and the flamboyant towering fountains shooting into the air. In the establishing shot one can see behind Gatsby’s house the dark and neglected Valley of Ashes on the left hand side and on the right hand side the excessively lit East Egg. This technique is used in order to convey this looming idea that The American Dream does not benefit everybody and is essentially a failure for the vast majority of people. The scene experiences a quick transition introducing an eye level long shot of swerving cars and frenzied party guests. The audience’s senses are assaulted by the disorientating sound of trumpets and car horns, giving momentum and a pulsing beat, which invigorates the audience. Lurhmann uses numerous zooming techniques as a way to immerse the audience in the raucous and recklessness of the drunken partygoers. Nick is swept into the entrance hall that is filled with people and
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