The Theme Of Feminism In The Handmaid's Tale

1647 Words7 Pages
A handmaid, in red. A wife, in blue. A commander. Two maids and a driver. Welcome to the house of Fred. What do they have in common? They have no say anymore. The government controls and only the government. Margaret Atwood is a Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, inventor and environmental activist. But what really got people interested was her infamous novel, The Handmaid’s Tale. It sparked many controversial arguments. Including the most prominent; Feminism. Margaret Atwood merely states the reality of Society through a depiction of a dystopian society.
Women are always going to be seen as objects in both of the societies, real world and dystopian. For centuries women have been kidnapped, used, and raped. In modern society
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Although we see more women under certain types of pressure from society- men do feel it too. Women aren’t seen as strong, capable of doing anything a “man can do”. According to a Slate magazine article by Michelle Goldberg, Will we ever have a women as a president, when Hillary tried to speak out about how sexism played a role in her loss, many of them reacted with disgust and claimed that she won’t admit that she is just a terrible candidate in general. She stated that, “According to a January PerryUndem study, a third of men that voted for trump, as well as a quarters of women who voted for him, said that men generally make better political leaders than women.” She later explains about a study that Professor Cassino conducted to introduce people into thinking about the decline in Male power. Most of the men lied when asked if their wives earned more money. Women do make more money than men in…show more content…
Their sneering headline, Hillary Clinton adds Misogyny-and more- to the list of things she blames for her 2016 loss, has a lot to say in their article. The author of the article, Aaron Blake who is also the senior political reporter for The Fix, claims that Hillary is basically complains too much and blames outside reasons for her loss. She fails to recognize that her mistakes are more than minimal. How this ties in with the Handmaid’s tale is how women are not allowed to read, write, learn. They don’t want them in power, knowledge is in the hands of the men. Now of course this is extreme but the main idea is still present. “Men generally make better political leaders than
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