The Therapeutic Alliance Is The Foundation For Successful Or Unsuccessful Treatment Engagement

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Introduction The therapeutic alliance is the foundation for successful or unsuccessful treatment engagement (Sprenkle et al., 2009). The extent to which clients are able to engage with the therapist, will likely determine the expanse of participation and commitment they will attribute to therapy (Sprenkle et al., 2009), or social work intervention in its entirety. To elaborate, consider patients diagnosed with CKD. CKD is a primarily asymptomatic, but progressive and physiologically degenerative disease; if specific protocols to maintain sufficient kidney function are not adhered to (Collins et al., 2003). One may assume, these patients may feel intrinsically oppressed by their diagnosis, because they are typically advised to make specific…show more content…
An individuals’ perception of him/herself and their environment, is continuously modified by stimulating interaction between: the person and the environment, and between the person and other people (Siegel, 2006). Neurobiological processes that allow human beings to have the capacity to teach, draw, maintain attention, and learn (Siegel, 2006), aid in one’s ability to interpret and react to their environment (Begley, 2007). According to Siegal (2007), people are “wired to connect” in the sense that the lack of socio-environmental stimulation can have a detrimental impact upon one’s health (Taylor, 2002). For instance, studies have shown people experience physiological pain following social rejection, yet these symptoms substantially improve following social inclusion (Taylor, 2002). Therefore, an individuals’ perception of whom they in relation to their environment is fundamental to their psychological wellbeing (Fishbane, 2007 & Siegel, 2007). The aforementioned sentiment holds particular truth for patients diagnosed with CKD. CKD patients often experience a dramatic morph in their identity, and accompanying roles. As patients become attuned to the “sick” or “ill” role, relationships with families and friends are impacted. To elaborate, patients may no longer be able to assume responsibilities of a full-time working member of society, or not be able to work
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