The Thirties and the Sixties: So Different Yet so Similar Essay

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The Thirties and the Sixties: So Different Yet so Similar

It seems impossible that I have lived through so many decades! I have lived through decades from the thirties to the sixties, and there are many similarities between the two decades. In both decades democrats gained control in the political arena. Both decades were a time of rapid change, socially, economically, politically, and culturally. The population in the United States greatly increased by about fifty-four million people between the thirties and the sixties. Both decades were affected by a war; the 1930’s was greatly affected by WWII, and the sixties was greatly affected by the Viet Nam war. It seems like just yesterday that we began the roller coaster ride of the 1930’s.
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These were perilous times. The thirties and the sixties were very different but they also were very much the same. Both decades saw the democrats take the presidency as well as the House and the Senate. Both decades were led by presidents who envisioned a “New” America. Roosevelt called it the “New Deal”, while the 60s president called it the “New Frontier”. Both called for liberal reforms. However John F. Kennedy was assassinated before he could carry out his vision(Ourdocuments.gov).
Both the thirties and the sixties saw entertainment become ever more popular. This is probably because people were under so much stress from the wars that they needed something to lighten the mood. In the thirties, people bought board games and parlor games, in the sixties theatre and musicals were all the rage. Monopoly came out in the thirties and sold millions in one week. In the thirties economics was the focus of politics, while in the sixties it was civil rights and women’s rights. Although the women’s movement is said to have really begun in 1848, the second wave of the women’s movement occurred in the sixties. With the encouragement of the director of the Women’s Bureau of the Department of Labor, Esther Peterson, President
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