The Threat Of The Tropical Cyclone

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Introduction Throughout the nation, natural, technological, and man-made disasters jeopardizes communities as a whole. Many people rely on their local communities emergency preparedness plans, while they should be utilizing their knowledge, information provided for them, and using their capabilities to ready themselves and their families. The outcome that can come from any disastrous event mainly relies on how you respond to the specific threat, and the steps one takes to minimize the risks of such a scenario. Being from Florida, I have been subject to several types, and forms, of disasters; but the most common and the one that can pose one of the greatest threats is the tropical cyclone, also known as the hurricane. When concerning this…show more content…
Many times, these choices can be based on their previous experience and their knowledge of tropical cyclones. Many families, including my own, that has been a resident of Florida for a multitude of years has experienced numerous storms and aware of their capabilities. Over the past quarter decade alone, there have been severe landings that have stricken the Florida Coast line, such as Hurricane Andrew in 1992, Hurricane Irene in 1999, and the four storms that landed in 2004, Hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne. All of these landings have convinced many people to seek further knowledge and to conduct better preparation standards in the inevitability of another landing. In fact, Chris Landsea, through the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Hurricane Research Division states, “For the U.S., the locations that have the highest chances are the following: Miami, Florida - 48%”( 2014). This means that every year Florida, Miami more specifically, has a forty-eight percent chance of being hit by a hurricane. With the high percentage of Florida possibly being struck each year, many residents have possibly become disillusioned about the possible catastrophic damage these storms can truly cause. In addition to the residential firsthand knowledge, and reoccurrence of these natural disasters, another aspect that can affect the decisions
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