The Tragedy Of King Lear

1745 Words Nov 14th, 2016 7 Pages
In William Shakespeare’s play The Tragedy of King Lear, human suffering is exploited through exploring social destruction caused by love, lust, and loss. King Lear’s kingdom is broken down through the excess of love and hate. Behaviors resulting from such emotions becomes tragic flaws for the characters within the play, as the need for approval disrupts all natural social order, which is then represented by the natural world. The natural world and nature of society become intertwined as the plot unfolds, and, is wholly represented within the storm scenes in Act III. The society in King Lear is based on the theory of The Great Chain of Being; the idea that society runs under the following order of God, the King, Noblemen, Commoners, and lastly Animals. In The Tragedy of King Lear, the natural world is an extension of man himself as it is depicted as a reflection of emotional turbulence of the protagonists’ mind and the turmoil caused by the destruction of natural social order. The upheaval caused by destruction of The Great Chain of Being, socially and naturally reveals the detrimental effects of destructing social order, leading to a tragic hero’s ultimate demise; for the natural world allows for catharsis, revealing the truth about the evils of the world.
Emotional turbulence results in social order destruction within The Tragedy of King Lear. When it comes to power, love is put aside for the hunger of authority and leadership. Love provides power to the king’s daughters…
Open Document