The Treaty Of Versailles And The End Of World War I

1487 Words6 Pages
The Treaty of Versailles was one of many peace treaties signed at the end of World War I. It ended war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed June 28, 1919. The signing of this treaty fell on the fifth anniversary of Archduke Franz Ferdinand’s assassination. Ferdinand was the prince of Hungary and Bohemia up until the date of his death. He was an heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne. The Treaty of Versailles was drafted or created by the representatives of Great Britain, Japan, the United States, Italy, and France. The agreement was created without any discussion with the “conquered” powers which included Germany and Russia. Besides the countries that created the document, there was no input in any form from other powers. Due…show more content…
The Germans were in shock and disbelief that their country would agree to be declared a loser in the Great War. Germany had made substantial progress in industrial production and believed not only that they were catching up to Great Britain’s level, but potentially able to pass them. The German people thought that the other countries felt jealous of their technological advancements and the Treaty was placed to restrict their power as a country. Germany thought they deserved to be the top leader. Since the Allied forces never invaded, the Germans were unaware of the ongoing quarrel and the reasons behind it. To show their Patriotism Germans openly volunteered to do their civic duties in the service. Certainly, there were casualties, but the locals never saw any battles on their own land and would not accept that there were other countries that had never “felt” defeated. They never actually did until World War II, when their country was bombed then they truly experienced war. Not willing to accept the guilt accusations of the Treaty, the German people blamed their representatives for engaging in political dealings and showing their unskillful ability in handling world affairs. The terms of the Treaty were not placed to “punish” Germany. The intent was to simply “handicap” the Germans due to the fact that the land that was claimed provided the Germans with all of their
Open Document