The True Essence of Romantic Love

1130 Words Jun 20th, 2018 5 Pages
In William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, love is exemplified more ways that we can imagine, from the undying love of two people to parental love. Love celebrated by the protagonists with playful sonnets to express their endearment and love for one another. Love that transcends from such powerful gazes and translates into an undying love. Society’s encroachment to a very innate and fundamental aspect of our being is met with violence and death. We must not forget that the very essence of love is that you cannot control love. It is innate, a reflex if you will, and for everyone the Holy Grail of life. In the prologue, the narrator begins with “A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life;” (prologue 6). The protagonists are being …show more content…
Innocent, pure, faultless, chaste, unblemished, righteous, pristine and immaculate, therefore how can we go wrong with love? Since time in memorial we all have written about love, for Fredrick Ham wrote, “Two souls with but a single thought,/ Two hearts that beat as one.” St. Augustine wrote, “Better to have loved and lost, than to have never loved at all.”, Karen Sunde wrote, “To love is to receive a glimpse of heaven.”, and in the immortal words of John Lennon, “All you need is love, love, love is all you need.”. It seems that we celebrate and long for love because we know it is truly, the ultimate high. We long for it because sometimes we think it is impossible to attain and yet we continue to walk the face of the earth in search for our true love, whether one believes it or not. The playful sonnet on act 1 scene 5 is an exchange between Romeo and Juliet referring to one another as once again Heaven-like creatures. Romeo begins, “If I profane with my unworthiest hand/ This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this:/ My lips, two blushing
Ty 4 pilgrims, ready stand/ To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss” (1.5.104-107). Romeo reveres Juliet’s hand almost like the Holy Grail and is ready to face the consequences of touching and kissing them. Juliet indulges Romeo with his play with words and replies, “Good pilgrim you do wrong your hand too much,/ Which mannerly devotions shows this;/ For saints have hands that
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