The Tyger Analysis Essay

1519 Words Apr 17th, 2012 7 Pages
An Incomprehensible Mystery William Blake’s The Tyger, in my opinion, is an intriguing poem that looks at the idea of how God is a mystery and how humanity is at a loss to fully understand his creations by contemplating the forging of a beautiful yet ferocious tiger. Blake begins the poem by beginning a conversation with the tiger and almost immediately begins his questions of who could make such a fierce creature. He wonders if God could really create such a creature or maybe it is a creature produced from a darker source. Blake also refers to the tiger as a form of art, almost as if the creator made the tiger perfectly. The image of a blacksmith is also given through the poem as Blake refers to a blacksmith’s common tools and …show more content…
This same concept is also seen as Blake consistently questions the tiger who made him, but never gives the tiger a direct answer, which gives the readers their own interpretation of the creator. Blake begins to worry of the horror of the tiger and actually begins to question if God really made it or perhaps a more evil immortal was behind it. Blake first questioned who created the tiger in “What immortal hand or eye”, then adds on to the mystery with “In what distant deeps or skies”. The “deeps” refers to hell, and Blake consistently refers to “fire” when referring to the tiger which gives strength to the assumption of the tiger being forged in the fires of hell. However, “skies” refers to the heavens and God. “On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire?” Blake again questions whether God (“wings”) or Satan (“fire”) created the tiger. Blake could assume the tiger was created by the devil because the devil is the source of evil and horror, which is why Blake is at a bewilderment of the creation of this creature because it is so beautiful but it’s so terrifying. However, Blake knows that God created all life in our world, yet he adds Satan as a possible creator because of the bafflement he witnessed of seeing the first glance of the tiger. Blake not only talks of fire and evil when referring to the tiger, but of art and beauty as well; “what