The Typical Role of Women in the Late 19th Century in the Awakening by Kate Chopin

574 Words 3 Pages
Sojourner Truth’s words in her speech, “Ain’t I a Woman?” served as an anthem for women everywhere during her time. Truth struggled with not only racial injustice but also gender inequality that made her less than a person, and second to men in society. In her speech, she warned men of “the upside down” world against the power of women where “together, [women] ought to be able to turn it back, and get it right side up again!” Today, America proudly stands thinking that Truth’s uneasiness of gender inequality was put to rest. Oppression for women, however, continues to exist American literature has successfully captured and exposed shifts in attitude towards women and their roles throughout American history. As a result of being …show more content…
Sojourner Truth’s words in her speech, “Ain’t I a Woman?” served as an anthem for women everywhere during her time. Truth struggled with not only racial injustice but also gender inequality that made her less than a person, and second to men in society. In her speech, she warned men of “the upside down” world against the power of women where “together, [women] ought to be able to turn it back, and get it right side up again!” Today, America proudly stands thinking that Truth’s uneasiness of gender inequality was put to rest. Oppression for women, however, continues to exist American literature has successfully captured and exposed shifts in attitude towards women and their roles throughout American history. As a result of being considered less than a man, women have been molded to fit into society’s expectations. The typical role of women in the late 19th century was that of a mother-wife, which involved staying home, nursing the children, tending their husband’s needs, and cleaning. Such traditional role was challenged in Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening. Edna Pontellier, the protagonist, plays the role of an ambitious and rebellious woman who goes against society’s expectations. In the novel, Edna places her family, especially her children, last and pursues the freedoms of education, money and sex. With a spirit of rebellion and desire to part from society’s norm, Edna “grew daring and reckless, overestimating her strength. She wanted to swim far out, where no woman

More about The Typical Role of Women in the Late 19th Century in the Awakening by Kate Chopin

Open Document