The Underground Railroad And Its Influence On The Civil War

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The Underground Railroad was neither underground nor a railroad. A revolutionary event taking place during the civil war, it was an informal network of sympathetic whites in violation of the "Fugitive Slave Act" passed in 1850 to help enslaved African 's escape secretly in order to gain freedom in Northern States or Canada. This research paper will examine the movement of the Underground Railroad by reviewing primary and secondary sources available to successfully describe several sentiments regarding the development as well as its influence on the Civil War. An hour before day light the horn is blown. Then the slaves arouse, prepare their breakfast, fill a gourd with water, in another deposit they dinner of cold bacon and corn cake, and hurry to the field again. It is a offense invariably followed by a flogging, to be found at the quarters after daybreak. Then the fears and labors of another day begin ; and until its close there is no such thing as rest. He fears he will be caught lagging through the day.. he fears, when he lies down, that he will oversleep himself in the morning. Life of a slave was not an easy one. Slaves were often chained when they weren’t working so they wouldn’t attempt to escape. Tobacco was a major crop in the upper South so tobacco farms solely relied on slaves to plant and harvest the crops; likewise for cotton plantations in the Deep South. Plantation owners would hire overseers to manage the slaves in the fields. Women, children, or

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