The United States Army National Guard

5059 WordsJan 19, 201721 Pages
The United States Army National Guard is currently faced with the significant task of helping its troops stay alive not only on the battlefield but also at home. Since 2011, the Army National Guard has buried 614 troops who died by their own hand. These men and women have come from every state and territory across the Unites States with the exception of the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands. States such as Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Minnesota have suffered the most loss with each state losing 29 people to suicide. These deaths are not on the battle fields of Afghanistan or Iraq. In fact, the combat deaths during the exact same time frame for Army National Guard troops only adds up to 447. The situation has…show more content…
Specifically, training is foundational to everything in the Army and helps to shape a young teenage boy or girl into a tank mechanic, administrative specialist, infantry officer, or any number of military occupational specialties (MOS). Some jobs require the additional support of civilian training and this is true in the special staff branches such as the Judge Advocate Generals corps, Medical corps, and Chaplains corps. Army Chaplains in particular are required to obtain at least seventy-two seminary hours and a Master’s degree in order to become a commissioned military officer. During their seminary time, future chaplains are trained in sermon preparations, church administration, and administering the ordinances of their faith group. However, they are rarely trained in addressing one of the most critical topics currently facing today’s military personnel. Specifically, this would be training in counseling troops who are experiencing suicidal ideations. Another possible place for members of the Army chaplain corps to receive training in addressing a potential suicidal person would be during their initial military instruction time at the United States Army Chaplain Center and School (USACHCS) which is located in Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Currently, USACHCS does not have training for this on their course curriculum for either the Chaplain Basic Officer Leaders Course (CHBOLC), the Chaplains Captain Career Course (C4), or the Brigade Functional Course for
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