The United States Involvement During The Vietnam War

1514 WordsMar 3, 20177 Pages
The United States involvement in the Vietnam War developed into one of the most brutal, yet necessary wars of The Cold War. Although the war was viewed poorly by most, it helped a weak, crumbling South Vietnam stand up to a strong powerful North Vietnam that was forcing communism on them. President Johnson even stated that “Our objective is the independence of South Vietnam and its freedom from attack.” The United States wanted to stop an oppressive government and to make sure the world is a safer, freer place for all people. The Vietnam War was worth fighting for as it sent a message to the world that communism is not the right form of government and that the United States was here to support small nations in dire circumstances. The war…show more content…
North and South Vietnam became separate countries and fought in many battles. This was referred to at the Indochina War. Ultimately the French were defeated and a peace treaty called the Geneva Split was signed by both sides making the 17th parallel the border between North and South Vietnam. Bao was then replaced by Ngo Dinh Diem, who had a pro-democracy and anti-communist point of view. South Vietnam was renamed the Government of the Republic of Vietnam. After the split of Vietnam, the United States became very interested in stopping the spread of communism. This policy lead president Dwight D. Eisenhower to support South Vietnam. At the same time, Diem’s policy was to get all Viet Minh and northern supporters out of South Vietnam. He did this by ordering mass arrests of communists and later tortured and executed them. An estimated 100,000 people were arrested. After this incident, Viet Minh and others began to attack South Vietnam aiming at government officials and other high profile targets. This lead to skirmishes and firefights between North and South Vietnam, which received the attention of the United States. The United States sent a team to South Vietnam to look at the potential of a war in Vietnam. The team concluded that the United States should build-up military, economic, and technical aid. After this recommendation, the United States increased aid, sent over 9,000 troops, and pledged
Open Document