The Use Of Medical Terminology Among Nurses

1277 WordsApr 26, 20156 Pages
“Good” Nursing Nurses, and the tasks they do are the working units of any medical establishment. The field of nursing is a unique occupation, a mixture of the medical and hospitality fields. A nurse must be well equipped to perform medical care while also comforting their patients. To accomplish this feat, a specialized language has been developed consisting of medical terminology, extensive documentation, and body language. With such a large amount of complicated information being transferred in medical occupations, naturally, there are many variations of the standard “nursing language”. Currently, the American Nurses Association has approved thirteen languages that support nursing care. With this lack of consistency and no standard…show more content…
This specialized terminology becomes even more complex in specialized units such as cardiology and neurology. Historically, nurses have documented their work using individual and “unit-specific” methods (Keenan). Consequence to this, there is a wide range of terminology to describe the same care. With this learning curve in place, a nurse must work even harder by familiarizing themselves with the new terminology, and caring for patients. “Nurses need to agree upon a common terminology to describe assessments, interventions, and outcomes related to the documentation of nursing care. In this way, nurses from different units, hospitals, geographic areas, or countries will be able to use commonly understood terminology to identify the specific problem or intervention implied and the outcome observed” (Rutherford). Say a nurse previously worked in a family clinic in a small city where they did only moderate procedures. Due to their medical training, they are familiar with what a coronary artery bypass graft is; however, when they transfer to a hospital’s cardiovascular department in a big city, and the doctor says that the patient will need a CABG, the acronym for coronary artery bypass graft pronounced “cabbage”. I personally would be concerned as to why the doctor would be suggesting a leafy vegetable for a patient who has narrowing coronary arteries cutting off blood supply to their heart. In addition to these issues, medical terminology also affects the
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