The Velveteen Rabbit

825 Words4 Pages
As young children develop attachments to the parents who comfort them, so too do they develop attachments to particular objects which they use to comfort themselves. An example of these close relationships between children and stuffed animals can be found in Margery Williams’ The Velveteen Rabbit. The protagonist of the story, after losing his china dog with which he had previously slept, utilized his rabbit as a replacement. After a while, the boy became attached to the rabbit. He slept with it every night, took it everywhere with him, and went so far as to take efforts to keep the rabbit comfortable by designing a nest for him while he played. Although that particular story was fictional, the relationship between the boy and his stuffed…show more content…
As I continued to play with him constantly and sleep with him every night, I slowly developed an attachment to him. Soon enough, I grew entirely unable to sleep without him, and refused to go anywhere or to do anything without him. Due to my excessive playing with him, though, after a few years, Ruff Ruff began to fall apart. In Margery WilliamsThe Velveteen Rabbit, the narrator pointed out that the rabbit’s fur had become shabbier, his tail unsewn, and his nose discolored, which can be attributed to the constant use of the rabbit. In the case of Ruff Ruff, his condition deteriorated as well, and eventually, the material on the outside of his ear came off, exposing the inner part of his ear. Although at first, I was upset over this tearing, I soon realized that the area in which the ear had been torn felt as though it absorbed less heat than the rest of his body. When I attempted to sleep at nights, the cool tear, when applied against my eye, was of significant assistance to me falling…show more content…
He grew so important to me that by the time I began preschool, I would not go anywhere without him. Ruff Ruff, however, could not handle such constant use for so many years. He became less sturdy and collected bacteria, leading to my eventual decision to stop sleeping with him and to store him in the closet in order to ensure that his condition did not worsen. Many children develop similar attachments to objects which they use for comfort as I did. In Margery Williams’ children’s book The Velveteen Rabbit, this relationship is demonstrated when the protagonist’s china dog gets lost and he sleeps with his rabbit as a replacement. His relationship with his rabbit becomes increasingly close, however, the overuse of the rabbit leads to the rabbit’s condition worsening. In the case of many other children, overuse is a significant factor which ultimately could lead to the end of their relationships with their comfort objects. In The Velveteen Rabbit, although the rabbit’s condition did worsen, in the end, his relationship with the boy ended due to concerns related to bacteria. Although in my case, bacteria and overuse were both prime concerns, as they are in many other relationships between children and comfort objects, the prospect of the embarrassment which would have arisen had people realized that I still slept with Ruff Ruff was the final factor that convinced me
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