The Violence Against Women Act

1498 Words Apr 26th, 2015 6 Pages
The final decade of the 20th century yielded many changes as the result of third-wave feminism. In 1993, the United Nations enacted the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women which called religious and cultural customs an excuse for gender-based violence (Goldscheid, 2008). In the early ‘90s, the Surgeon General referred to domestic violence as a threat to the health of Americans and in a similar move, the American Medical Association created a campaign targeted at ending domestic violence (Eisler, 1992). Taking its first formal stance on the issue, the outcry of the people lead the United States to pass the Violence Against Women Act in 1994. Like the majority of social movements, the third wave of feminism originated from the actions actions of grassroots organizations. In regards to support for the Violence Against Women Act, most of these groups were composed of victims of gender-based crime such as major interest groups like the National Network to End Domestic Violence, the National Organization for Women, Written by then Senator Joe Biden, the Violence Against Women Act was passed as part of the massive Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. The first of its kind, the bill encompassed a number of protections to women that were victims of gender-based crime. In order to implement the act, the agency known as The Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) was created as part of the Department of Justice. The office’s main objective is…
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