The Watergate Of The White House

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Richard Nixon’s six year stint in the White House is and was reviewed as a pivotal and influential time period in various aspects of American infrastructure. Nixon had come into office after the consistent twenty year dominance of presidential politics by a left-winged Democratic coalition. America coming out of conflicts across the globe was universally known as a global police force which was notorious for large-scale pre 21st century military conflict. When Nixon resigned, (The first United States president to do so) a conservative Republican regime was born that would in turn dominate the next twenty years of presidential politics. The post-Nixon Republican Party was known for delivering aid to our allies across the globe, and staying…show more content…
Such distinction is understood by a transitional politician. His tendency and philosophy toward his foreign and domestic policy were mirror images in regards to their intent. Conservative, but understandably so as the late sixties going into the seventies was the descent of liberalism’s early to mid-century dominance. His right-wing conservative system, could not be established without first deconstructing FDR’s liberal construct. During his Presidency it was noted that Nixon was “only as conservative as he could be” and “only as liberal as he had to be” (Hughes 1). He was accredited with the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency but had also made closed-door comments about how if he had not done so, the Democratic Congress would have forced more liberal laws and legislation into his term. Nixon was at times a hypocritical president especially in times that it was beneficial to him. Nixon was a president that ideologically could have opposed restriction on compensation and prices and stayed true to the beliefs in a private setting, while using them during his election-year to appeal to specific organizations. Yet this political/tactical malleability should not conceal his steadfast political purpose. His simple yet successful endgame was as such; move the country to the right. The Nixon administration signaled the end of
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