The Women's Movement Research Paper

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There were also distinctions in how diverse groups pursued women’s liberation. The emphasis for particular issues could vary between women due to differences in class. For instance, a middle-class woman may put more focus on the dissatisfaction of being a housewife than working class woman who has to take on jobs to support their family may. There were disputes between middle class and working class lesbians over the merits of the butch-femme roles which had common before the women’s liberation movement. For African American and other minority women, there was the dynamic of dealing with issues of both sexism and racism. Thus, there were some activists who were less inclined to see the issue of women’s equality as universally common in its…show more content…
When the pill become publicly available, it greatly reduced the likelihood of pregnancy from sexual intercourse. This pathed the way for a cultural shift on sexual matters. Sexual activity became less connected to reproduction and the culture shifted toward a general expectation of premarital sex by men and women. While this change rattled some of the double standards toward male and female sexuality, it did not produce sexual equality, and came with its own negative consequences. The social acceptance for women declining sexual activity was eroded, and many women were pressured into sexual activity and subjected to sexual exploitation. Some feminists, such as Marge Piercy, criticized the sexual revolution as a male sexual revolution, in which men continued to treat women as subordinate, yet with more sexual license and less social commitment for themselves. As cultural shifts in sexual issues expanded, there were women’s liberationists who developed notions of sexuality in regard to women’s interests. In 1966, Mary Sherfey published an article challenging the Freudian medical belief that women had types of orgasms. Various women debated issues of pornography and prostitution; with some contending that pornography promoted the oppression of women and prostitution was a degrading form of exploitation, and others contending for the toleration of such practices. The…show more content…
Some women’s activists had also been involved with the civil rights movement, the anti-war movement, black power, and the new left. People with multiple movements could also regard them as connected within broader visions of transforming society. It was similar to the civil rights movement, in that you had a group which was seeking to achieve a state of political, economic, and social equality. The women’s liberation movement held some similarities with the black power movement in that it challenged cultural perceptions of their groups and sought to establish new ideas for claiming pride in their identities. Though the women’s movement also had its distinctions. Given that women were very intimately connected with men in society and their personal lives, the women’s movement took on some highly-personalized aspects, which other movements such the civil rights and anti-war movements did not necessarily deal with to the same degree. The broad variety of political, economic, social, and cultural issues contrasts with movements which relatively more narrow in their focus, such as the anti-war movement. The women’s movement contained some general similarities with other movements of the period, most notably civil rights, though it also had its own particular distinctive
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