The World We're In by Will Hutton

4102 WordsJun 25, 201817 Pages
The World We're In by Will Hutton If you're American, you probably haven't heard of this book. "The World We're In," by British author Will Hutton, is aimed at Britons with the goal of convincing them to join the European Union as full members. As such, it pits positive "European" democracy and capitalism against the less positive "American" versions. (Specifically, Hutton is attacking conservative American ideology, but in the end, this doesn't matter so much; see below). I'll give the book a "+", but for rather complicated reasons. This book is a classic example of taking two gray objects, then painting one black and one…show more content…
He needs to set Europe up against a villain, and the obvious choice is the United States. After all, his purpose is to cast Europe as the next superpower, the one that can challenge America in its dominant position, and bring some higher morality to our savagery. Does he succeed? I'll give his arguments a B+. The problem is that Hutton waffles between logic based on essentialism and choice, depending on the situation. One of his key points is that Britain is "fundamentally European" at heart, and thus all of its flirting with American-style capitalism is not only out of character, but is doomed to fail. He gives examples of various "flavors" of European capitalism (French, German, Italian), but emphasizes the overall similarities between these flavors and current British sentiment to hammer home the point that Britain is nonetheless European at heart. How silly to be mesmerized by the flashy object across the Pond! Home is right here, across the Straight. But if this is the case, then why worry? If Britain cannot but be European (since it is fundamentally so), surely Hutton wouldn't have to work so hard to cast America as the villain. It seems a little odd that Britain could be so gullible as to totally abandon its fundamental nature when no other country in Europe was so beguiled. Aware of this at some level, Hutton also presents a line of moral
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