The mere presence of antisocial behavior is not sufficient to diagnose a person with antisocial

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The mere presence of antisocial behavior is not sufficient to diagnose a person with antisocial personality disorder. In order to be diagnosed with this disorder one must display a pattern of violation of other's rights and of disrespectful behavior, which appear after the age of 15. This individual will also display some behavioral problems so called before the age of 15 such as conduct disorder. The individual must be at least 18 years old. The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of Schizophrenia or a Manic Episode. In addition, according to DSM-V diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder can be made only if a person meet at least the three of the following criteria's: 1) failure to comply with…show more content…
According to Cecley(1988) people with Antisocial Personality Disorder have congenital inability to understand and express emotional experience despite proper understanding of the language. Thus, a person suffering from antisocial personality disorder could not understand that their behavior cause suffering, they are not able to develop conscience and are deprived of empathy and remorse. Other researchers indicate reduced activity in the frontal lobes of the brain. These lobes are responsible for executive functions: long-term planning, prioritizing objectives, assessment and concentration of attention. EEG pattern in individuals manifesting antisocial behavior resembles that in young children. This may indicate that the physical presence of a delay in the maturity of the brain. People with antisocial personality disorder also have difficulty in achieving the state of physical arousal-their heart rate remain unchanged or does not increase until the last minute. They also have no fear so they take action despite the risk. Literature also draws attention to the relationship between high levels of testosterone and antisocial behavior. There are also publications (Cloninger, Reich, Guze, 1978; Grove, Eckert, Hestory, 1990) that indicate a genetic basis for antisocial and criminal behavior. For example: studies of adopted children whose biological parents were characterized by antisocial behavior, show that children are more likely to exhibit such behavior.

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