“The sun never sets on the British empire” a true statement of the sheer power of the British

1000 WordsApr 23, 20194 Pages
“The sun never sets on the British empire” a true statement of the sheer power of the British empire from mid 1600s up to the second Great War, and considered one of the greatest empires ever built and definitely one of the largest. Britain is a small island located North, North West of main land Europe, shared with Ireland and Scotland to the West, being a small island country, materials were scarce to come by, but the British were able to get around this with trade and colonization. One key aspect to Britain’s success would be her navy, proclaimed in their own patriotic song Rule, Britannia! Positioned on an island and the world being 75% water they adapted very well at landing ships to the most barren remote places on earth. Hitting…show more content…
Aborigines of Australia are a unique race, when the British first landed on the island of Australia in mid-late 1780s and was used as a convict island. A convict island is where countries send their unwanted criminals or settlers to remote place, just to get them out of whatever country. Like other areas around the world they were pre-inhabited with in an indigenous race; fast-forward roughly 60 years, and the attitude towards aborigines had not changed and neither the population of whites to Aboriginal. With many newer nation or colonies, the main question is how do you treat the inferior race, how do you get rid of the ones you do not need anymore, or how do you be fair and civil. Australian legislation called for a policy of “amity and kindness” with “any unnecessary interruption” but that was not always the case with the other colonist of Australia. Report of a Speech by William Wentworth, mentions the helping and betterment of the aboriginal race “but they might be settled without the aid of the Government”; he refers to them as mere savages “They must give way before the arms, aye!”. 4860 miles North West of Australia, similar actions were taking place in India, a nation being separated by religion, one becoming slaves while others were given higher privileges but still treated like a second-class citizen, even seen today with many Indian youths preferring British colleges compared to Indian ones.

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