Theme Of Beauty And The Bride By Angela Carter

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Angela Carter, an English writer, is best known for her feminist rewriting of classical fairy tales. In her stories she prominently uses themes, such as, virginity, the pornographic image, violence and sex, and many others. Degrading someone to the status of a mere object, in other words objectification, is a theme Angela Carter shows in many of her fairy tales, specifically the objectification of women. According to Carter, the objectification and subjugation of women is part of a “latent context” of fairy tales that she expressed simply by virtue of being a woman. Both “The Tiger’s Bride” and “The Courtship of Mr. Lyon” are fairy tales intertextually linked with “Beauty and the Beast” and show the reader Carters’ views on femininity. Not…show more content…
Her objectification continues until the end of the story. She says, “The six of us, mounts and riders both-could boast amongst us not one soul, either, since all the best religions in the world state categorically that not beasts nor women were equipped with the flimsy, insubstantial things ….” (Carter, 44), contending that men see women as soulless, just as they see animals soulless. She feels that the men who claim to possess souls consider her as nothing more than an item of physical worth and that is why she calls them “flimsy” and “insubstantial”. When the heroine says that she is no longer resembles the soubrette, she begins to claim her own desires, meaning that she can no longer submit to society’s female stereotypes. She declares, “I will dress her in my own clothes, wind her up, send her back to perform the part of my father’s daughter.” (Carter, 46). Through the symbol of the soubrette, Carter shows the reader that this view of women weakens the character and prevents her from fulfilling her potential. Thus, “The Tiger’s Bride”, the heroine must accept the animal in nature in herself and in the Beast, in order to be free of the human world…show more content…
Lyon”. Carter retells the well-known fairytale “Beauty and the Beast,” but her version is far from “classic.” It is a tale of self-discovery and rejection of female objectification. In the beginning of Carter’s retelling of the classic fairy tale “Beauty and the Beast,” Beauty is seen as a penniless, helpless girl, whom the rich, powerful and world-weary Beast forces to live in his house. When her father uses her as payment for his debt to the Beast she becomes an object. However, she rapidly becomes the more active, experienced, and adventurous character. Throughout the story, Beauty proves herself to be more than just a traditional fairy tale heroine, but in the beginning, she conforms to the paradigm. Just like many of Carter’s heroines, she must start within to be able to then break free from the restrictions and assumptions of patriarchal society. In the words of da Silva, “The daughter is conscious of her annihilation in the patriarchal society but she doesn’t have autonomy to overcome it.” Even though Beauty finds enjoyment in reading fairy tales while living with the Beast, it is as though despite living in a modern world with telephones and cars, Beauty wants to believe in the conventional “happily ever after.” By comparing Beauty to the immaculate snow upon which she gazes Carter emphasizes Beauty’s femininity, innocence, and virginity. By associating Beauty
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