Theme Of Father And Son Relationships In Night By Elie Wiesel

1212 WordsDec 17, 20175 Pages
One of the major themes that can be found in Night, by Elie Wiesel, is one of father/son relationships. To quote a father from the book, Stein, “The only thing that keeps me alive is knowing that Reizel and the little ones are still alive.” Not all father/son relationships are as good however. Another part of the book reads, “I once saw. . . a boy of thirteen, beat his father for not making his bed properly. As the old man quietly wept, the boy was yelling, ‘If you don’t stop crying instantly, I will no longer bring you bread. Understood?’” In presenting examples like these, Wiesel communicates a message of the importance of good father/son relationships to his readers. This paper will examine father/son relationships throughout the book,…show more content…
There were also several negative father/son relationships found in the book. One such relationship is that of a young pipel, and his father. Wiesel writes, “I once saw one of them, a boy of thirteen, beat his father for not making his bed properly. As the old man quietly wept, the boy was yelling, ‘If you don’t stop crying instantly, I will no longer bring you bread. Understood?’” This is an example of how life in the concentration camp causes a boy to throw aside his relations for the sake of his own survival. A second example is that of Rabbi Elihou and his son. While Rabbi Elihou cared deeply for his son, the Rabbi’s son viewed his father as a burden and left him behind. Shortly following the passage about the Rabbi looking for for his son, Wiesel writes, “But then I remembered something else: his son had seen him losing ground, sliding back to the rear of the column… A terrible thought crossed my mind: What if he had wanted to be rid of his father?” The third example of a poor father/son relationship occurs in the cattle car. A worker throws bread into the cars causing immediate desperate fighting. An old man manages to grab a piece of bread shortly before this passage, “Stunned by the blows, the old man was crying: “Meir, my little Mier! Don’t you recognize me… You’re killing your father...I have bread... for you too…. for you to…but the other threw himself on top of him. The old man

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