Theme Of Love In Beloved By Toni Morrison

733 Words3 Pages
Toni Morrison is an award winning author, known for her intense books about slavery and love. She is interviewed in Bonnie Angelo’s “The Pain of Being Black”; Bill Moyer’s video series, A World of Ideas; and Emma Brockes’ article, “Toni Morrison: ‘I want to feel what I feel. Even if it’s not happiness.” Morrison’s family and experience with segregation inspires her novels that express her moral and sociopolitical beliefs. Morrison declares her main motivation for her novels is love between lovers and family members, motherhood in particular (Moyers). A common trend between her words is the issue of excessive love, most notable in Beloved in which a mother commits infanticide to prevent the child from subjected to slavery (Moyers). Morrison…show more content…
During her early teen years, she began a domestic job under a white family, and the author believed that her employer was justified in yelling at her “for being useless at her job” when she was unable to use the cleaning technology that she never had exposure to (Brockes). Her segregated childhood taught that African Americans were inferior to whites and accordingly placed expectations in her mind about how she should act. African American women were depicted to be competent in domestic chores, catering to whites’ every need; thus Morrison’s self-esteem was threatened when she was scolded for not even meeting meager standards. Eventually, Morrison came to realize that racism “is a scholarly pursuit…all over the world” (Angelo). Morrison hopes to change the world’s outlook on bias and racism subtly from lessons weaved into her stories to better the lives of the oppressed around the…show more content…
Morrison attributes the daily difficulties that teenage mothers face to society and blames the public for not being more concerned about morality and the welfare of mothers and babies (Angelo). The writer’s strong attachment to her own children strengthens her empathy for teenage mothers who share the same situation as everyone’s grandmothers – both groups were or are pregnant at a young age (Angelo). She admires the grandmothers’ ability to raise children and work simultaneously like many women today; nevertheless the author acknowledges the help the grandmothers most likely had from their friends and family (Brockes). Morrison asserts raising children requires the entire community (Angelo); teachers, parents, siblings, and peers influence a child’s development altogether. The community as a whole determines whether the impact is possible or negative. Each child deserves a fruitful, beneficial environment regardless of their familial background. Education can spread unmoral concepts like racism, yet equal opportunities can improve society by raising awareness of troubling issues. In addition, Morrison views teenage pregnancy as a political issue, additionally accusing the public for not caring about unwed mothers “unless they’re…poor” (Angelo). Poor mothers are more likely to be reprimanded for taking irresponsible risks, failing to consider if child support is acquirable and the possibility of
Get Access