Theme Of Oliver Twist

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The word ' money ' sums up a theme that Dickens has been preoccupied with in many of his novels . Dickens has studied the nineteenth century commercially-oriented England and observed the corrupting influence of money on members and deplorably , suggesting how material possessions have become the criterion of evaluating a human being . Dickens's critics are well aware of this devastating influence . Humphry House confidently tells us that Dickens's plots and characters are , " constructed round an attitude to money . Social status without it is subordinate . "1 This however , is a general comment on the Dickensian text . But in Oliver Twist , the theme gathers momentum and unfolds itself in a manner that attracts our attention , hence its…show more content…
Poor characters , show endurance and fortitude in the face of want and hardship . The generalized tone of the novel evokes poverty both pretended and genuine as a dismal reality of the nineteenth century England , a reality that asserts itself in an acquisitive and monetary society , nullified by the pursuit of material values . The characters who are saved from the grip of material values are those who decisively reject these values as ends in themselves . The rise and fall in society through the corrupting power of money is also an important theme of the novel . The novel which is of a simple structure , deals with the development of the protagonist Oliver . Dickens describes the phases of Oliver's progress in terms of a child's instinctive and therefore virtuous response to his natural surrounding and in terms of negation of childhood simplicity . Oliver is a member of that vast and cruel machine of the Victorian society with its obsession with money and class distinction…show more content…
He is neither a revolutionist who believes in ' collective action' against the oppressive institution of capitalism , nor a deserter who betrays the cause of the working class . He shows an individualistic action in facing extremes and incarnates his belief in " individual responsibility and freedom of choice . " 6 With the Victorian novelists , the scope of imagination takes a further step by being regarded as a shared experience between the artist and the reader . We may do well here by recalling one of Dickens's approaches to involve the reader in the narrative action through his use of humour which becomes a connective agent . In The Life of Charles Dickens , Forster defends Dickens's humour in terms of its effect on us : " To perceive relation in things which are not apparent generally , is one of those exquisite properties of humour – which brings us all upon the level of
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