Theme Of Realism In A Streetcar Named Desire

1442 Words6 Pages
A Streetcar Named Desire is also a kind of social realism because the play deals with many issues like class distinction, gender roles, immigration, and power plays between women and men (Kolin 25). Williams’ play also belongs to the American genre of Southern Gothic. Stories about the wealth and the decadent lifestyle of southern gentry and their destruction by the urban crush of modern American industry hold great fascination for American audiences. Blanche represents the faded, corrupt culture of the south (O'Shea 10). The setting of the play is limited to the Kowalskis’ apartment and the street directly outside. Williams' play certainly has unity of place; the entire drama takes place in the French Quarter in New Orleans.…show more content…
The play is presented chronologically, from Blanche’s arrival at her sister's apartment in New Orleans in May and ends with her departure a few months later in September. Her past is revealed only through flashbacks, which come as her own confession to Mitch and through what Stanley finds about her (O'Shea 12). The play is divided into three significant seasonal periods over which it takes place: the spring of Blanche’s arrival, the summer of her hope of a second chance, and the fall of her exposure, defeat, and removal to the mental institution…show more content…
The play focused on the feeling of repulsion between them as Blanche grows to despise Stanley because he beats and strikes her pregnant sister and Stanley sees Blanche as a distributive force in his household as he despises Blanche’s sense of refinement. Blanche contempt and hatred for Stanley is far more evident throughout the play for example: her statement that she will burn Allan’s letters after he has touched them, and her descriptions to Stella and Mitch of his commonness and brutality. Moreover, Stanley’s hatred for Blanche is far more evident as he brings her the bus tickets to leave his apartment and return to Laurel, he attacks Blanche for losing Belle Reve, he destroys Blanche’s relationship with Mitch by telling him about her rotten past and the fatal scene which ends with raping her (Murphy
Get Access