Theme of Sacrifice Leading to Transformation Illustrated in Hughes' 'The Negro Speaks of Rivers' and 'The Secret of the Sea'

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Water is the primary wealth of human civilization, and the link to everything in the world. Throughout history, poets and other artists have used water to reveal the secrets to the world, with sweat and tears of Sailor, Africans and African-Americans who are unrecognized. It shows the connection to the dawn of civilization. They are the ones who are unrepresented. For African and African-Americans lake possibly associated with slavery; while for sailors it might be an opportunity to develop themselves. While “The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” connects the spirit and history of the African/African-American community, and the poem, “The Secret of the Sea,” expresses the strengths and potential of the hearts of sailors, and in both of poems they …show more content…
Hughes starts with Euphrates River for a reason; this river dates back to 4 BC. “I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young,” (line 5), the way that reader explains “I bathed in the Euphrates” means that his ancestry, Africans, have been there since the beginning of civilization. With the nearest river it states, “I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to sleep.” (lines 6), the interpretation of this quote highlight how African has grown as the community to built home for themselves, and made a settlement next to another river. In the first river, you can express it by the beginning step of this community, and how the next river is the stepping stone for the race. In the next river, “I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it.” (Lines 7), starting for this period, the African race were made to into slaves, and the creation of freedom started. Hughes did not what the readers to interpret the pyramids as one of the Seven Wonders of the World, but the difficulty of a peasant, who actually helped to create the pyramids. Finally, the Mississippi River is the last stop of the journey for the African race. “I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln went down to New Orleans, and I’ve seen its muddy bosom turn all golden in the sunset.” (Lines 8-10), the trip down to the Mississippi was a dream for many African-American. One of the hugest steps for this community was when