Themes In The Hound Of The Baskervilles

860 Words4 Pages
Fear at the Baskerville Hall “Fear keeps us focused on the past or worried about the future. If we can acknowledge our fear, we can realize that right now we are okay. Right now, today, were are still alive, and our bodies are working marvelously. Our eyes can still see the beautiful sky. Our ears can still hear the voices of our loved ones.” - Thic Nhat Hanh In Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles, Holmes and Watson were brought by Dr. Mortimer to solve the mystery behind the Baskerville killing hound. This was because after his friend Sir Charles’ death Mortimer couldn’t stop wondering if the hound was the cause of his death. When they found that the hound was actually owned by Mr. Stapleton, an innocent neighbor who turned out to be an evil heir of the Baskervilles, everyone was taken by surprise. Doyle develops the theme of fear when he describes that fear induces people to not consider the consequences of their actions, guides people to undertake acts that they know are wrong, and brings people to lose their judgment. First, Doyle develops the theme of fear when he shows that fear induces people to not consider the consequences of their actions. For instance, when Mr. Barrymore, the Baskerville’s butler, exclaimed that they would never be “...easy in our minds at Baskerville Hall,” (82). Mr. Barrymore was revealing to Sir Henry that he and his wife no longer felt content at Baskerville Hall because of Sir Charles death. As can be seen, the
Get Access