Themes Of Civilization In Jack London's The Call Of The Wild

1001 Words5 Pages
On Buck's journey to discovering what he truly wanted he learned many things. However, the most important thing was ‘One must live in hWho would expect an animal who loves both humans and his ancestor’s way of living to choose between? The first chapter in Jack London's novel The Call of the Wild presents a dog's omniscient point of view of living with humans. Buck, the protagonist, is facing a dilemma, being pulled between civilization and the wild. Throughout the first few chapters in Jack London's novel, In the novel, The Call of the Wild, the grim struggle between civilization and the instinctive call is shown throughout the perilous journey of Buck.
The force that’s pulling Buck towards civilization is a strong one. At the beginning
…show more content…
When Francois and Perrault sold Buck, he fell into the hands of Hal and Mercedes. Owners who had no clue what they were doing and led themselves to countless tragedies that resulted in Buck meeting John Thornton, who vastly strengthened Bucks belief of civilization. “ For Thornton however, his love seemed to grow and grow. Nothing was too great for Buck to do when John Thornton commanded.” (60). When Buck first met John he instantly felt love like no other he's felt towards him. He sacrificed his life in multiple perilous situations to save and emphasize his devotion to his new owner. He jumped off a cliff for him, broke three of his ribs when saving John from a river and in one instance, almost killed a man for pushing his beloved owner. These encounters influenced Buck and encouraged him to be with man.
Throughout the novel, Buck was tempted to answer the call, the pull of the wild. His first experience with the wild occurs also in the beginning of the novel. The man in the red sweater makes Buck understand “A man with a club was a lawgiver He is introduced to the law of club and fang, the reign of primitive law. One must kill or be killed. “He was beaten (he knew that); but he was not broken. He saw, once and for all, that he stood no chance against a man with a club.” (16). After this encounter Buck changed his way of acting. He no longer was naive about men but instead became intelligent and

More about Themes Of Civilization In Jack London's The Call Of The Wild

Get Access