Theological Differences Between Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli and John Calvin

2834 Words Apr 14th, 2013 12 Pages
THEOLOGICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MARTIN LUTHER, ULRICH ZWINGLI AND JOHN CALVIN
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this essay is to discuss the significant theological differences that occurred between Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli and John Calvin. To gain a greater understanding of their theological differences it must first be discovered who these prominent men were. Once this is achieved why they longed for reformation will be discovered. In doing so many similarities in what they were trying to bring in the form of reform will be shown. After this a detailed understanding of their major 33differences will be shown. It will be discovered that these differences occur around the understanding of the Eucharist. This will lead ultimately to the
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As a result a rift began between Luther and Zwingli. Prince Phillip Hesse attempted to come to a solution of disagreement between the two parties. As a result two wars of Capel would begin. The first had no bloodshed. The second led to Zwingli being defeated and dying in 1531. Zwingli had many similar ideas as to Luther but his ideas especially concerning the Eucharist were much more radical which ultimately led to his death. Presbyterian theology could not have developed without the efforts of Zwingli. He was a true pioneer and reformer of his day.
JOHN CALVIN (1509-1564) John Calvin was known as a theologian and French reformer. He studied arts at the college de Montaigu. 1528 he studied civil law at Orleans and later at Borges. Here he discovered the ideas of humanism. 1531 Calvin returned to Paris to study letters and publishing his commentary in 1532. In 1533 due to his ideas regarding reform he fled Parris. He would eventually end up in Basle. In 1536 he was convinced by G. Farel to stay in Geneva and help in organization of the reformation. His ideas would soon have him moved on to Strasbourg where he was Pastor for another three years. In 1541 he returned under invitation to Geneva where he would stay for a further fourteen years. His wife died in 1549 leaving him to raise two children. By 1555 opposition to Calvin and his views would cease. In 1559 he was