Theory of Success in What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, by Marshall Goldman

1298 WordsJun 18, 20186 Pages
What Got You Here Won’t Get You There In his book What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, Marshall Goldman puts forth the theory that success itself can lead to future failures if those who succeed become complacent and don’t recognize our ability to become stagnant. He brings forth concepts that exalt our faults as virtues, simply because our faults are who we are. As individuals, we exhibit behavior that defines us. Goldman stresses the obvious in that our habits and shortcomings if unaddressed, can lead to inconsistencies and even challenges. He notes that for the continued growth of leadership, mindfulness in all areas of life cannot be understated and under groomed. Areas that may prevent a leader and by default an organization from…show more content…
The problem here is not merely boasting about how much we know. 7. Speaking When Angry: Using emotional volatility as a management tool. When you get angry, you are usually out of control. It’s hard to lead people when you’ve lost control. 8. Negativity, or ‘Let Me Explain Why That Won’t Work’: We all know negative people in the workplace. They’re incapable of saying something positive or complimentary to any of your suggestions. The need to share our negative thoughts even when we weren’t asked. “negatrons” are people who are constitutionally incapable of saying something positive or complimentary to any of your suggestions. 9. Withholding Information: The refusal to share information in order to maintain an advantage over others. Intentionally withholding information is the opposite of adding value. 10. Failing to Give Proper Recognition: The inability to praise and reward. In withholding your recognition of another person’s contribution to a team’s success, you are not only sowing injustice and treating people unfairly, but you are depriving people of the emotional payoff that comes with success/ instead they feel forgotten, ignored, pushed to the side – and they resent you for it. In depriving people of recognition, you are depriving them of closure. 11. Claiming Credit that We Don’t Deserve: The most annoying way to overestimate our contribution to any success. Claiming credit is adding to the

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