These resistance movements, Oka, Gustafsen Lake, and Burnt Church each had their own reasons as to

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These resistance movements, Oka, Gustafsen Lake, and Burnt Church each had their own reasons as to why they started, and how the First Nations people fought for what they believed in. They fought for their rights to fish, to keep their sacred land safe and to be able to use sacred land for their Sun Dances. These resistances were between the First Nations people and the non-First Nations people, the Oka resistance was the Mohawk people and they were trying to protect their lands from an impending golf course the town of Oka was going to build. Gustafsen Lake was the Ts’Peten people and their use of land for their Sun Dance. The Burnt Church Resistance was the Mi’kmaq people and their use of fisheries in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. These…show more content…
This was sacred land to them and was where their ancestors had been buried, and they did not want to see more land being used for a golf course, as one person had said: “The Pines is a sacred place for me, for all Mohawks. It’s like a church. The Pines is our sacred burial ground. We call it Onen’to:kon. It means “under the Pines.” We have been in this area for as long as we can remember…” (Pertusati, 1997). This group of people over many years had been trying to get their land back, by their Aboriginal Rights, the land had once been “154 square miles” (Pertusati, 1997) but it: “…was expropriated for the use of the St. Sulpice religious settlement. Over the years, further land expropriation reduced the size of what remained of Kanehsatake to 3.6 square miles” (Pertusati, 1997). These Mohawk group of people originally had the right to the land and it was theirs at one point but was then taken away for use of a religious settlement and had never been fully given back to them. From then on the Mohawk people have been trying to get what is left of their land back, and to stop the golf course from being built. But even some of the people who were not First Nations had problems with the town of Oka building the golf course, because “the golf course expansion and luxury housing development project… was a private club built on what they felt was public land” (Pertusati, 1997). So both First

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