This essay, "1920s vs 1960s", writen in AABB format, deals with the comparison of; general statistics, fashion styles of both men & women, music, & controversial issues.

1502 Words May 8th, 2002 7 Pages
1920's vs. 1960's

Over the past century, people living in the United States have experienced many changes. As the times change, so do the people. In the 1920's, people acted differently then compared to the people in the 1960's. Yet, they both have one thing in common; they shaped our history.

In the 1920's, about 106,521,537 people inhabited the United States. It was a rough period in our history, with about 2,132,000 people unemployed and murder, swindles, and racketeering as the most popular crimes. The life expectancy of men and women during the 1920's was 53.6 years and 54.6 years respectively. Amazingly, the illiteracy rate was at a new low of only 6% of the population during this time period. Yet, despite all the aspects, which
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Women in the early 1960's wore bouffant hairstyles, and like the 1920's, knee length dresses. However, later in the decade, mini skirts, or hot pants, with go-go boots became popular. These skirts revealed their legs as bodywear revealed their curves. Women's hairstyles even changed. Women either wore their hair very short or long and lanky. Also, peasant skirts, or granny dresses, and chunky shoes somehow came into fashion during this period of time too. By the end of the decade, unisex dressing was very popular especially with the hippies. Both sexes wore bell-bottom jeans, love beads, and embellished T-shirts. This was also the era of the Afro, which both sexes of African Americans wore.

"There's nothing surer; the rich get richer and the poor get poorer." This was considered the beliefs of the roaring 20's. The Cotton Club was the first club that was opened to both white and black people. Coincidently, it was packed nightly. The 1920's is known as the Jazz Age. During this time period, the best selling pop hits were sentimental ballads, old-fashioned waltzes, and nonsense songs. In 1925, the Grand Ole Opry was transmitted on radio from Nashville for the first time. People were traveling to more places, which influenced their songs. Many of the songs produced during this period were about places such as the songs "Chicago" and "California Here I Come."

In the 1960's, America was ready for a change. Black rhythm and blues known as Motown became popular. Bob

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