Throughout Alfred Hitchcock’S Filmography, There Are Conspicuous

1661 WordsMar 6, 20177 Pages
Throughout Alfred Hitchcock’s filmography, there are conspicuous elements, such as murder and mystery, that make him the so-called “Master of Suspense.” Yet, Hitchcock’s films have other not-so-obvious elements that are shared in multiple of his films. His camera work is what captures the subtle elements, one of the most common implicit tropes are the challenge and switch of the gender norms and sexual ambiguity by the Hitchockian characters and it is not the exception in the film Strangers on a Train (1951). The main characters, Bruno Anthony (Robert Walker) and Guy Haines (Farley Granger), do not ever mention their sexual orientation, but it is implied through the camera that they are homosexuals concealing their identities in a critical…show more content…
According to the definition of “Cruising” from the Urban Dictionary, it states: “To search (as in public places) for a sexual partner.” In a time as the 50s were, wherein sexuality did not enjoy the freedoms that are taken for granted by today’s Western society; homosexuals would have clandestine encounters in public places in a pre-Internet and pre-social media era. The places would vary from public parks, bars, beaches, and even trains. Usually they were known by everyone in the gay community and therefore frequented. In Hitchcock’s Strangers, people from all walks of life take the train to mobilize across the country. In fact, Bruno and Guy are on a train bound to New York, this is revealed by Bruno, happily expecting Guy to go with him all the way to the train’s final destination: “This is wonderful—having your company all the way to New York.” During 1950 the state made legal history when it became the first state in the Union to reduce sodomy, any kind of sexual activity between two or more people of the same sex, to a misdemeanor and the maximum penalty was of six months in prison. It is never provided an explanation on the reason Bruno is taking the train other than to get to New York, after all Bruno is a good for nothing and he admits it

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