Tinker V. Des Moines Independent Community School

3253 Words Jun 30th, 2015 14 Pages
Abstract
In 1969, a group of students filed a lawsuit against their school district claiming that their First Amendment rights were violated because the school district wrote a policy that prohibited them from wearing black armbands in a silent protest of the Vietnam War. Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969) ruled that students are entitled to their First Amendment rights as long as they are not causing a disruption to the school environment. This paper outlines the procedure and rulings in the case as well as other legal rulings that have expanded on when censorship of students is protected in public school settings as well as provides a personal reflection on how such matters can impact my future as a school administrator.
Case (Citation) Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1966) was first brought to the United States District Court in 1966. The plaintiffs were John F. Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker, and Christopher Eckhardt. All were minors at the time so they were represented by their fathers, Leonard Tinker and William Eckhardt. The defendant in this case was Des Moines Independent Community School District. After the United States District Court ruled in favor of the defendant, the plaintiffs filed an appeal in 1967 with the United States Court of Appeals Eighth Circuit, Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1967). The appellants in this case were John F. Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker and…
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