To Build a Successful Organization

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To build a successful organization, there needs to be a variety of people playing different roles in order for things to run smoothly. Some of these roles are easily defined while others may have more confusing boundaries, such as the difference between a manager and a leader. You can be a manager and a leader at the same time, but just because you're a phenomenal leader doesn't guarantee you'll be a great manager, and vice-versa, so what's the real difference? In his book On Becoming a Leader, Warren Bennis writes about a few crucial differences between a leader and a manager. Here are some key differentiators from the book, as well as insights from Gene Wade, founder and CEO of UniversityNow, and late management guru Peter Drucker. 1.…show more content…
"Leadership is not what you do—it's what others do in response to you," he says. "If no one shows up at your march, then you're not really a leader." And if people do decide to jump on board because you've inspired them, then it means that you have created a bond of trust within the company, which is essential especially if the business is rapidly changing and needs people to believe in its mission. As for managers, Drucker wrote that their job is to maintain control over people by helping them develop their own assets and bringing out their greatest talents. To do this effectively, you have to know the people you are working with and understand their interests and passions. The manager then "creates a team out of his people, through decisions on pay, placement, promotion and through his communications with the team." "Managing a project is one thing, empowering others is another thing," Wade says. 3. The leader asks "what" and "why," whereas the manager asks "how" and "when." In order to ask "what" and "why," you have to be able to question others why certain actions are occurring—and sometimes this involves challenging your superiors. "This means that they're able to stand up to upper management when they think something else needs to be done for the company," Wade tells us. "I always tell my folks, 'I don't expect to be right all the time. I expect to be wrong a lot.'" If your company experiences failure, a leader's job is to come in and say,
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